Performance

Question: 

Has there been any research or studies on long-term deflection of metal plate connected wood trusses? How much deflection is allowed?

Question: 

I am looking for information on point loading trusses. We manufacture mounting structures for solar panels. Typically, 10 to 15 sq. ft. of solar panel is supported by one standoff. Under extreme conditions – 50 lbs. per sq. ft. of wind load - we can transfer 500 to 750 lbs. of force onto one point of one truss. Are there any standards on this issue?

Question: 

How long does it take the moisture content to stabilize in a wood truss? I live in southern California. Also, how much deflection should be expected in a scissors truss over a partition wall?

Question: 

I am thinking of using wood trusses for the roofing/ceiling structural systems on some houses I shall build. I remember, though, an engineer/volunteer fireman commenting back in 1989 that the connector plates are prone to expand and pop off, early on in a fire, causing catastrophic structural failure. Was this the case, and if so, has this problem been corrected?

Question: 

A question has come up concerning sloped roof trusses and fire assembly ratings. Some are reluctant to rely on test results from flat (parallel chord) trusses applied to sloped roof trusses. Do you have any information regarding the suitability of the fire rated ceiling assemblies for sloped roof trusses? Does the “minimum depth” requirement of the parallel chord assembly apply to the minimum depth of a sloped roof truss (i.e., heel height?)

Question: 

Does SBCA produce any products detailing how to market and sell roof and floor trusses to builders for whom stick framing has been the standard way of building? Products that detail the cost savings when compared to traditional stick framing?

Question: 

Occasionally we deal with truss failures due to impact and or crushing forces such as trees falling onto roof structures. At what point can the truss no longer be repaired? Also, what should an adjuster look for when determining repair-ability? Or should a storm adjuster basically punt and call a consultant for every truss failure?

Question: 

The grading rules usually permit some percentage of visually graded lumber to be below grade – I believe it is 5%. ANSI/TPI 1 requires that all lumber used in trusses be of the grade specified by the truss design. A strict interpretation of ANSI/TPI 1 would require that the fabricator cull the 5% that is off grade. What are your thoughts on this?

Question: 

I was wondering if you have any information or anecdotes relating to the deflection performance of long span scissors trusses? We recently sold a job with 70 ft. long scissors trusses. The customer is in the process of installing the trusses and doesn't like the deflections he is seeing. To make matters worse, the scissors trusses are framing into a valley set (which we provided) that is erected on 35 ft. Howe trusses. The Howe trusses are exhibiting very little deflection. Any ideas?

Question: 

I am a professional engineer looking for information concerning the failure of metal plate connected wood trusses and methods of repair. I am looking for this information with regard to developing recommendations for the repair of truss systems in the floor structures of two-story multi-family dwellings. I see frequent failure of truss systems of this type in both in bending and due to catastrophic failure at the gussets.