Design

Question: 

When you’re selling trusses through a lumberyard and the contractor calls to say that the “trusses don't fit correctly,” who has the ultimate responsibility for the trusses? I argue that the lumberyard is responsible since we have provided them with all the information on how the job was designed, even though they may or may not have passed this information on to the contractor.

Question: 

How often are trusses repaired?

Question: 

I am installing a 40-foot scissor truss that is designed to deflect about ½ inch. I am concerned that the deflection will cause an interior partition wall to pick up some load from the truss and transfer it to the floor system. Should I double up the I-joists under this partition to pick up the extra load?

Question: 

Our home has 2x4 roof trusses spanning 25 ft. spaced 16 in. O.C. Currently, there is limited attic storage on a plywood subfloor on the bottom chords, accessed via a small hatch in a closet. We would like to install a fold-down attic stair with a rough opening size of 25.5 in. x 54 in., with the long dimension perpendicular to the trusses. This would mean cutting the bottom chords of three trusses to frame the opening. Is this possible?

Question: 

My company supplied roof trusses for a hotel project. The building inspector shut the project down because the trusses were not designed to account for additional snowdrift loading. The construction plans did not contain any snowdrift loading information. The architect is claiming it is our responsibility to determine drift loading, therefore we must fix the problem. Do you have any documentation to help us dispute the architect’s claim?

Question: 

What are the requirements for installing “valley set” overlay roof trusses? I am interested in nailing and support conditions. Some engineers ask for the bottom chord of the valley truss to be ripped to match the roof pitch of the underlying trusses. Is this necessary?

Question: 

I am looking for information on point loading trusses. We manufacture mounting structures for solar panels. Typically, 10 to 15 sq. ft. of solar panel is supported by one standoff. Under extreme conditions – 50 lbs. per sq. ft. of wind load - we can transfer 500 to 750 lbs. of force onto one point of one truss. Are there any standards on this issue?

Question: 

Is the truss designer or the building designer responsible for calculating snow drift loads on a roof system?

Question: 

Would you please inform me of the specified requirements of the size and the amount of nail attachments from the truss to the top plate?

Question: 

Is it common practice for the supplier/distributor of a truss to provide a publication regarding temporary bracing with the delivery of the material?