Design

  • Couple the IRC requirements with energy code requirements that are pushing more buildings to utilize a higher heel, and it is apparent the connection of high heels to walls is a key application issue.
  • The SBC Industry Testing Task Group and the TPI TAC/SBCA E&T Testing Review and Vetting Group has begun to evaluate the needs and priority of testing the performance of assemblies to quantify the effect of heel blocking. 
  • It is clear from the very specific and isolated heel height testing already performed that there is an opportunity to provide revisions to 2009 and 2012 model code blocking requirements to transfer the lateral load resulting from wind and seismic events into braced wall lines.
  • By approaching engineering and testing through the eyes of framers, NFC can make the framing process more reliable and cost effective.
  • SBCRI is fully capable of testing any type of full-scale assembly, which can provide framing contractors great insight into the performance of the products they use on a daily basis.
  • Testing raw materials, products and structural systems will ensure that framers understand real performance and derive maximum value from the product or engineered solution.
Involvement in the initial design and engineering phase of each project helps UTS set itself apart as a true partner instead of just another supplier.
  • The 2012 IRC does not provide sufficient details on how to connect wood trusses to braced wall panels.
  • SBCA has developed a couple of details and will continue to develop standard details that provide code-compliant connections between roof/floor trusses and braced wall panels.
  • Component manufacturers can provide framers with specialty or standardized blocking panel products to reduce the time needed to install the blocking between trusses for these connections.

 

When designed and installed correctly, components can greatly reduce the time and materials required to frame a structure. 

Last summer, Superstorm Sandy caused an estimated $65 billion worth of damage in the U.S., a total surpassed only by Hurricane Katrina in American history. Sandy was the largest hurricane on record to hit the Atlantic Coast, at over 1,100 miles in diameter. So while it hit the New Jersey shores the hardest, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, its disastrous effects were felt as far inland as Wisconsin and Michigan.

While the chaos and destruction wrought by this powerful natural force is sobering, it’s hard not to simultaneously focus on the positive stories that came out of such events. One such story is that of Cussewago Truss LLC in Cambridge Springs, PA. It’s a tale of the marvels of wood, the value of engineering and the fruits of a well-executed plan.

  • Use of galvanized box nails may result in shear walls with a shear capacity significantly below the nominal unit shear capacities given in SDPWS.
  • Thus, the majority of WSP shear walls have a shear capacity with a high degree of design value variability. This may have unintended consequences that are unknown and unappreciated by the professional engineering and/or building design community.
  • Once SBCA and SBCRI were certain their testing and engineering analysis was consistent and repeatable, they were persistent in bringing all WSP shear wall performance issues to the attention of APA, AWC, ICC-ES and ICC.  
  • Understanding how the computer software automatically loads a truss can help designers avoid unintended consequences when optimizing trusses.
  • When fascia loads are missing from a project, there is incorrect loading on the jack trusses, sub girders and the corner girder/hip jack.
  • Missing loads can lead to extensive repairs and may even require that the trusses be revised. 
Beyond spotting their own errors and minimizing headaches and guesswork for your production line, truss designers also have the ability to make or break your company through the quality of their designs.
  • Innovation brings change that builds vigor and excitement in an organization or industry.
  • We should challenge ourselves to look for ways to innovate and foster the discomfort of change.
  • I am a proud supporter of the innovation revolution taking place within the SBC industry, and I invite you to join me as an advocate for change.