Design

The truss industry is currently employing ASCE as its source for the loading of live loads to the bottom chord of trusses for uninhabitable attics, in accordance with the International Residential Code and the International Building Code. However, there currently is a discrepancy between ASCE 7, the IBC and the IRC. This report examines the discrepancy and the correct loading for proper truss design.

This Research Report provides construction details for residential deck ledger attachment to metal plate connected wood truss floor systems. Proper attachment of the deck ledger to the house is critical for ensuring that an “attached” deck is safely and securely supported at this location. 

This presentation provides information on the use of gypsum wallboard in single membrane floor protection.

The capacity of a ribbon board and its system through the composite of the ribbon board, floor sheathing and bottom plate of the wall has not been ascertained. In order to provide better guidance, a series of tests were conducted in order to determine the capacity of the ribbon board system.

A lot of engineering goes into the design of metal plate connected wood trusses, including the connector plates themselves. 

There are circumstances when the deflection requirements for a specific structure that utilizes floor trusses as structural members are questioned. The current residential and commercial building codes provide minimum design requirements for loads and for deflection of structural floor members, which also apply to floor trusses. The building designer may specify more stringent requirements. This research report will focus on manufacturer or trade association deflection requirements for a number of floor topping/covering related products

When a homeowner asked for the contemporary look of a curved roof without the expense of beam or steel construction, the designer knew the answer was trusses.

This presentation provides information and analysis of fire retardant-treated wood and metal plate connected wood truss designs.

Depending on the type of fire-retardant treatment (FRT) used, materials may require a change in design values and reduction in connector capacity. This report intends on providing a clear perspective of interiror FRT wood used in Truss designs.

This report discusses ways of increasing the energy efficiency requirements of the building envelope within the context of the requirements of the 2009, 2012 and 2015 International Residential Code (IRC) and IECC for ceiling insulation and truss heel heights.