Installation

Question: 

How important is continuous lateral bracing in roof trusses? Is it detrimental to the roof integrity if it is missing?

Question: 

I have a 29 x 72 mobile office with a 2-foot deep wooden truss above the ceiling that a client is required to sprinkler. Is there any way to avoid sprinklering above the gypboard ceiling?

Question: 

The industry suggests notching the gable end truss to support the overhang. Is this wise? What about a structural gable, or a gable designed with drag loads, or one with only partial bearing? How safe is it for a framer working with a truss that has the top chord cut repeatedly?

Question: 

Manufactured gable ends are actually frames even though they are often referred to as trusses. The webs are “studs” oriented vertically and usually spaced at 12, 16 or 24 in. O.C. The gable end frame is designed to transfer vertical loads from the roof to the continuous bearing wall below. Another way gable end frames are different from trusses placed in the interior of the structure is that frames experience perpendicular wind loads. The sheathed frame transfers the wind loads to the roof and ceiling diaphragms and vice versa.

Question: 

What is the recommended standard spacing for open-web wood joists? I have seen them placed 24 in. O.C. Is this acceptable for a customer who will have an exercise room with 500 pounds of free weights? I understand there are problems with bouncy floors with 24 in. spacing. Is this true?

Question: 

Would you please inform me of the specified requirements of the size and the amount of nail attachments from the truss to the top plate?

Question: 

I need to obtain some information on fire-retardant-treated roof trusses.

Question: 

Are there any trusses that are supported strictly by the wood itself without any mechanical connections such as brackets?

Question: 

I am looking for a 1-hour roof/ceiling assembly for wood truss construction. I would like to apply the drywall directly to the bottom of the truss and also have insulation for sound control. Is this possible without using channels and what UL number would I use?

Question: 

I almost always see wood trusses erected with no stability bracing at points of support. It seems to me that common sense and section 3.3.3.4 of The American Wood Council’s National Design Specification for Wood Construction (NDS) require that lateral support be provided at points of bearing. Plywood decking doesn't provide any more restraint for a wood truss than it does for a roof joist. I doubt if it was a concern with short span trusses having 4 in.