Product Performance

Question: 

I have been told that the high temperatures and low humidity present in attics can cause deterioration of wood, leading to truss failure. Is this true? If so, what length of time are we looking at and can we see the deterioration in the wood by visual inspection?

Question: 

I am thinking of using wood trusses for the roofing/ceiling structural systems on some houses I shall build. I remember, though, an engineer/volunteer fireman commenting back in 1989 that the connector plates are prone to expand and pop off, early on in a fire, causing catastrophic structural failure. Was this the case, and if so, has this problem been corrected?

Question: 

Are there any typical wood truss span tables for roofs and floors available? Standard framing details for use in preliminary design?

Question: 

How important is continuous lateral bracing in roof trusses? Is it detrimental to the roof integrity if it is missing?

Question: 

We are finding it difficult to design permanent diagonal bracing for scissors trusses. The truss is often only a few feet in depth, which does not provide adequate room for diagonal bracing. Has SBCA come up with recommendations for permanent bracing of scissors trusses?

Question: 

How do trussed roofs perform in long-term service? Are there any reports of rusting in the nail plates, rot/insect attack, do-it-yourself modifications, or condensation and ventilation problems in the attic?

Question: 

How do you evaluate whether a metal plate connected truss is still usable after exposure to fire? Are there any recommended tests?

Question: 

The Gypsum Association “Fire Resistance Design Manual” (GA-600-12) lists file RC2601 with two layers of 5/8 in. gypsum wallboard (GWB) on wood joists.

Question: 

I was working on a job that had trusses that span more than 78 ft. with a 9/12 pitch. We had the #5 truss being installed when the #4 truss gave way. The trusses that were being installed are a two part system. The bottom set is what you would call hip trusses. The trusses contained 2x6 bottom chords, 2x8 top chords and rafters, and 2x4 webs. The roof sheathing was to be 3/4 in. plywood, 15 lb. felt paper and roof shingles. The ceiling was to be 5/8 in. drywall. The #4 truss sheared about 1 in. off the wall.

Question: 

Some truss lumber repair nailing patterns call for 16d common nails. Most nail guns do not support 16d nails, but have an equivalent to a 12/10d nail. Is there a substitution guide or ESR report that could help us?