Product Performance

Question: 

How do I, as a truss manufacturer, adequately advise my customer against the dangers of 60 ft. and over truss span installations?

Question: 

Can one use pressure-treated lumber in metal plate connected truss construction? If so, are special plates or coatings required?

Question: 

As an engineer, I have noticed truss designers in some high wind states routinely using “Main Wind-Force Resisting Systems” wind pressure coefficients as opposed to “Components and Cladding” coefficients to design for wind uplift. A roof truss is not a main wind-force resisting system and would have to have a tributary area of more than 1000 sq. ft. before qualifying for the lower Primary Frame coefficients. In my experience this practice is routine.

Question: 

We have a local builder wishing to use floor trusses with a 2-hour assembly. I have shown him the 2-hour design on pages 17-27 of the second edition of SBCA’s Metal Plate Connected Wood Truss Handbook. Is this assembly UL approved? If so, what is the design number?

Question: 

I am a building designer on a salt storage building project. I would like to use metal plate connected wood trusses in the design. What should I specify for the metal connector plates?

Question: 

Is there a chart available on the allowable amount of deflection on floor trusses?

Question: 

I have built a 30 ft. x 40 ft. pole barn with nine 30 ft. 2x4 7/12 pitch trusses that are 5 ft. O.C. I am planning to finish out the interior and will attach 7/16 x 4 x 8 OSB sheets to the trusses for my ceiling. Along with this, I will have to add several 2x4 nailers across the 30 ft. span between the trusses to attach the sheeting to. My question is: will these trusses have any problem supporting this ceiling? I am not planning on anything being placed in the section above the ceiling and there will be no walls or supports erected between the ceiling and the floor.

Question: 

Can I put a wood deck (1/2 in. plywood) on top of the bottom chord of a 26 foot span truss 24 inches on center?

Question: 

Manufactured gable ends are actually frames even though they are often referred to as trusses. The webs are “studs” oriented vertically and usually spaced at 12, 16 or 24 in. O.C. The gable end frame is designed to transfer vertical loads from the roof to the continuous bearing wall below. Another way gable end frames are different from trusses placed in the interior of the structure is that frames experience perpendicular wind loads. The sheathed frame transfers the wind loads to the roof and ceiling diaphragms and vice versa.

Question: 

We have been using Turb-O-Webs for about four months. We are very happy with their performance, although there have been a few ripples along the way. The main thing that concerns me at present is the need for performance documentation and testing data. Do you have anything that will help, or know of people or organizations that could offer assistance?