Loads

Question: 

Is the truss designer or the building designer responsible for calculating snow drift loads on a roof system?

Question: 

The truss industry maintains that the design of truss roof and floor system permanent bracing is the responsibility of the building designer. System permanent bracing covers the entire structure and all bracing element interactions.

Question: 

How much OSB can be stacked on a floor deck without damaging the trusses?

Question: 

Can you explain drag loads and how to calculate a drag load pertaining to roof trusses?

Question: 

I am installing a 40-foot scissor truss that is designed to deflect about ½ inch. I am concerned that the deflection will cause an interior partition wall to pick up some load from the truss and transfer it to the floor system. Should I double up the I-joists under this partition to pick up the extra load?

Question: 

We are planning to add 1/2 in. cement board and 3/8 in. quarry tile to a kitchen floor. We need to know if the floor trusses will handle the additional weight. The floor trusses are 19.2 in. O.C. and the loading numbers are 40-10-0-5. What do these numbers mean?

Question: 

I am thinking of using wood trusses for the roofing/ceiling structural systems on some houses I shall build. I remember, though, an engineer/volunteer fireman commenting back in 1989 that the connector plates are prone to expand and pop off, early on in a fire, causing catastrophic structural failure. Was this the case, and if so, has this problem been corrected?

Question: 

I am a truss manufacturer in an area of the country that often has some pretty severe winters. It concerns me how little some of the local builders seem to know about snow load design. What are some of the things that need to be considered?

ASCE/SEI 7-16 Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures has revised Chapter 30 regarding Components & Cladding (C&C) wind loads on roofs. This report clarifies the type and scope of changes being made that will also change in the 2018 edition of the model building codes. 

The truss industry is currently employing ASCE as its source for the loading of live loads to the bottom chord of trusses for uninhabitable attics, in accordance with the International Residential Code and the International Building Code. However, there currently is a discrepancy between ASCE 7, the IBC and the IRC. This report examines the discrepancy and the correct loading for proper truss design.